ERISA-Sixth Circuit Holds That Michigan State Law Which Taxes Claims Paid By, And Imposes Reporting And Other Requirements On, Self-Insured Health Plans Is Not Preempted By ERISA

In Self-Insurance Institute of America, Inc. v. Snyder, No. 12-2264 (6th Cir. 2014), the plaintiff, Self-Insurance Institute of America, Inc. (“SIIA”), represents various sponsors and administrators of self-funded ERISA benefit plans, which it claims are affected by Michigan’s Health Insurance Claims Assessment Act (the “Act”). SIIA argues, among other things, that ERISA’s express-preemption provision, 29 U.S.C. § 1144(a), prohibits the application of the Act to ERISA-covered entities.

In analyzing the case, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals (the “Court”) held that the Act escapes ERISA preemption. The Court said, first, that the Act functions by imposing a one-percent tax on all “paid claims” by “carriers” or “third party administrators” to healthcare providers for services rendered in Michigan for Michigan residents.”Carriers” include sponsors of “group health plans” subject to ERISA. On top of the tax, every carrier and third-party administrator paying the tax must submit quarterly returns with the Michigan Department of the Treasury and keep accurate and complete records and pertinent documents as required by the Department. Every carrier and third-party administrator must also develop and implement a methodology by which it will collect the tax subject to several conditions.

The Court said, next, that ERISA supersedes any and all State laws insofar as they relate to any employee benefit plan subject to ERISA. 29 U.S.C. § 1144(a). However, the Court found that the Act does not “relate to” any such plan, because the Act does not: (1) interfere with plan administration (the Act does not require a plan administrator to change how it administers the plan at all), (2) create inappropriate administrative burdens (despite requiring the returns and records, since those are not the plan’s core functions) or (3) through its residency requirement, interfere with the relationship between the plan and its participants (even though the plan may be required to collect some additional information from participants). As such, ERISA does not preempt the Act.

Posted in:
Updated:

Comments are closed.