Employment-Eighth Circuit Rules That Federal And State Claims Fail Because The Plaintiff Was An Independent Contractor

In Alexander v. Avera St. Luke’s Hospital, No. 13-2592, (8th Cir. 2014), pathologist Larry Alexander (“Alexander”) suffered a heart attack in March 2008, underwent a heart transplant in May 2009, and was hospitalized for bipolar disorder in October 2010. In August 2011, Avera St. Luke’s, a non-profit corporation operating St.Luke’s Hospital in Aberdeen, South Dakota (“Avera”), terminated its December 2008 Pathology Services Agreement with Dr. Alexander, invoking the provision that either party may terminate the Agreement with or without cause on ninety days prior written notice. Alexander brought this action against Avera, alleging violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (“ADEA”), the Family and Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”), and the South Dakota Human Relations Act (“SDHRA”). The district court granted Avera’s motion for summary judgment, concluding that each of these statutory claims failed because undisputed material facts demonstrated that Alexander was an independent contractor rather than an Avera employee. Alexander appeals.

After analyzing the case, the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals (the “Court”) agreed that Alexander was an independent contractor when performing under the Pathology Services Agreement, and affirmed the district court’s holding. Why? The Court said that Alexander appeals the dismissal of his statutory claims that Avera violated his rights under the ADA, ADEA, FMLA, and SDHRA. Each of these statutes limits its protections to “employees.” Independent contractors are not covered. Although the analysis differs somewhat under each statute, based generally on the test in Nationwide Mut. Ins. v. Darden (Supreme Court 1992), the Court concluded that Alexander is an independent contractor, because:

— Avera had no right to control the specific manner in which Alexander rendered pathology services;

— Avera did not provide Alexander with benefits or malpractice insurance;

–Avera did not withhold income and FICA taxes from Alexander’s monthly compensation and reported his income on a Form 1099, and Alexander reported his compensation as the income of a self-employed independent contractor; and
— Alexander had the contractual right to hire substitute pathologists and assistants at his own expense (including his wife), had no weekly hours requirement, was never assigned duties not specified in his contract, held other medical employment during much of his time at Avera, and was never bound by a non-compete agreement.