Employment-Third Circuit Requires A Stay From One Day To The Next To Be Considered Inpatient Care Under The FMLA

In Bonkowski v. Oberg Industries, Inc., No. 14-1239 (3rd Cir. 2015), the plaintiff, whose employment had been terminated, was attempting to invoke the protections of the Family and Medical Leave Act (the “FMLA”). The district court had ruled that the plaintiff was NOT entitled to this protection, because he did not show that he had a “serious health condition” under 29 U.S.C. § 2611(11)(A), i.e., “an illness, injury, impairment, or physical condition that involves (A) inpatient care in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility,” and therefore was not entitled to leave (or protection) under the FMLA. The plaintiff appeals this ruling.

The crux of this case is an interpretation of the regulation at 29 C.F.R. § 825.114, which defines the terms “inpatient care”-for purposes of determining if a serious health condition exists- as “an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical facility, including any period of incapacity as defined in 29 C.F.R. § 825.113(b), or any subsequent treatment in connection with such inpatient care.” The Third Circuit Court of Appeals (the “Court”) concluded that “an overnight stay” under this regulation means a stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility for a substantial period of time from one calendar day to the next calendar day as measured by the individual’s time of admission and his or her time of discharge. The Court said that, since the plaintiff was admitted and discharged on the same calendar day, he did not have an overnight stay, and thus did not have a serious health condition. Accordingly, the Court affirmed the district court’s ruling.