ERISA-Eleventh Circuit Reviews An Appeal Involving An External Review Of A Claim For Health Benefits

In Alexandra H. v. Oxford Health Ins., No. 15-11513 (11th Cir. 2016), plaintiff Alexandra H. appeals from the district court’s grant of defendant Oxford Health Insurance, Inc.’s motion for summary judgment on Alexandra’s claim under ERISA. Alexandra sought benefits for continued partial hospital treatment for her anorexia, which were denied on the ground that the level of care she sought was not medically necessary. After her claim was initially denied through internal reviews by Oxford, she sought and obtained further review through an external process provided by the insurance contract between her employer and Oxford, of which she is a beneficiary. When the external review proved adverse to her claim, she initiated her ERISA suit in the district court.

Alexandra argues that the district court erred in holding that she is barred from litigating the issue of medical necessity in her ERISA case on the ground that the adverse external review of her medical necessity claim already and finally decided the issue against her. She challenges the district court’s decision on several grounds. First, she asserts that the record of the external review should be excluded from the ERISA proceedings. Second, she argues that the contract in suit must be interpreted pursuant to choice of law stated in the contract (New York), and that under New York law, the adverse external review decision is not binding on the medical necessity issue in her ERISA case. And third, she contends that if the record of the external review is properly in the record before the ERISA court, and if the result of the external review is deemed to bar her ERISA remedy, then the external review process is preempted by ERISA, with the effect of the preemption being that she may proceed with her ERISA case in district court as if the external review had not occurred.

Oxford counter argues that the record of the external review should be before the ERISA court, that the adverse decision of the external review should preclude further litigation of the medical necessity issue in the ERISA case, and that the external review process if thusly enforced in the district court is not preempted by ERISA.

Upon reviewing the case, the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals (the “Court”) said that, after careful consideration of the parties’ briefs, the record in the case, and with the benefit of oral argument presented to the court, we conclude that the district court correctly decided that the record of the external review is properly before the district court in this ERISA case, but erred in holding that the adverse external review decision barred Alexandra from presenting her challenge to the adverse medical necessity determination. Because the external review process does not conflict with ERISA, it is not preempted. Accordingly, the Court affirmed in part, reversed in part and remanded the case back to the district court for further proceedings.

 

 

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