Employee Benefits-DOL Says That Organ-Donation Surgery Can Qualify As A Serious Health Condition For Purposes Of The FMLA

In WHD Opinion Letter FMLA2018-2-A, the U.S. Department of Labor (the “DOL”) concluded that organ-donation surgery can qualify as a “serious health condition” under the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (the “FMLA”).  Here is what the DOL said.

BACKGROUND.  The FMLA entitles eligible employees of covered employers to unpaid, job-protected leave for specified family and medical reasons.  Eligible employees may take up to 12 workweeks of leave in a 12-month period for, among other things, a serious health condition that renders the employee unable to perform the functions of his or her job. 29 U.S.C. § 2612(a)(1)(D); 29 C.F.R. § 825.112(a)(4).

The FMLA defines “serious health condition” as an “illness, injury, impairment, or physical or mental condition that involves” either “inpatient care in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility” or “continuing treatment by a health care provider.” 29 U.S.C. § 2611(11).  Implementing regulations define “inpatient care” as “an overnight stay in a hospital, hospice, or residential medical care facility, including any period of incapacity… or any subsequent treatment in connection with such inpatient care.” 29 C.F.R. § 825.114.  The regulations also specify that “continuing treatment” includes “incapacity and treatment,” “chronic conditions,” “permanent or long-term conditions,” and “conditions requiring multiple treatments.” 29 C.F.R. § 825.115.  For all conditions, “incapacity” means “inability to work, attend school or perform other regular daily activities due to the serious health condition, treatment therefore, or recovery therefrom,” and “treatment” includes “examinations to determine if a serious health condition exists and evaluations of the condition.” 29 C.F.R. § 825.113(b), (c).  An employee is incapacitated if he or she is “unable to work at all or is unable to perform any one of the essential functions of the employee’s position,” including when the employee “must be absent from work to receive medical treatment.” 29 C.F.R. §§ 825.113(b), .123(a).

OPINION.  An organ donation can qualify as an impairment or physical condition that is a serious health condition under the FMLA when it involves either “inpatient care” under § 825.114 or “continuing treatment” under § 825.115.  Thus, an organ donation would qualify as a serious medical condition whenever it results in an overnight stay in a hospital.  Of course, that is not the only means for organ donation to involve “inpatient care” or “continuing treatment.” Organ-donation surgery, however, commonly requires overnight hospitalization, and that alone suffices for the surgery and the post-surgery recovery to qualify as a serious health condition.